Overflow #2: Royal Access

Each Monday during this Overflow blog series, I post a blog that runs parallel to Unruined – a series I’m teaching at Awaken right now through the book of Nehemiah. This blog series is a platform to dissect some of the content I didn’t get to explore during the message.

Although it was only week 2, I believe the message I delivered on Sunday was arguably the most important message of the entire series. Not that it’s all downhill from here, but because it laid the foundation for the future work we are asking God to do.

The topic was prayer…but since the purpose of this blog series isn’t to recap the messages, you’ll have to watch or listen to the message yourself. (Click here for the archive.)

Also, if you’d like, you can go to awaken.church/unruined for info about Unruined Prayer Groups, prayer text alerts, and to download social media graphics!


2_royalaccess

Nehemiah was the king’s cupbearer. Probably one of many, but a cupbearer nonetheless. He lived in the king’s palace and he ate the king’s food. Literally. It was his job. He was one of the last lines of defense against assassination by poisoning.

Realizing that Nehemiah lived in the king’s palace, ate his food, and regularly spoke to the king may elevate him in our minds higher than it should.

It seems easy to understand that God would someone like him. Because…well, he’s Nehemiah! He lives with the king!

When you put Nehemiah on too lofty of a pedestal, you may also decrease your position as well. This is when you’ll be tempted to start making excuses like, “God can’t use me because I don’t have the influence or opportunities like Nehemiah did.” “I’m not in a position of power and authority like he was. How could God use little old me?” Can you hear your whiny little voice now? I can hear mine.

Let’s chat about Nehemiah’s position and ours for a moment…

A life of integrity doesn’t happen overnight.

Nehemiah didn’t get hand-selected to be the king’s cupbearer because he won Babylon’s Got Talent or got voted to the top of Babylonian Idol. He got selected because he was wise, knowledgable, and trustworthy. You don’t become wise, knowledgable, and trustworthy by luck. It takes time. A lot of time. And it takes faithfulness to even the seemingly mundane tasks.

Many times we slack off in the seemingly unimportant tasks while we wait for something that seems “important.” But as I’ve often heard it said, “If you wait around to be handed something important, you may never be handed anything at all.”

There were years of Nehemiah’s life that were not lived in the royal quarters, eating the royal food. But he was faithful even in those moments.

Your faithfulness in the seemingly mundane tasks of life may be the key that unlocks the bigger calling God has for you! (tweet this)

You already have royal access!

Stop the pity party already! So what if Nehemiah had access to the king. If you’re a follower of Jesus, you have access to The King of Kings!

According to Hebrews 6:19-20, Jesus went before us, granting us access behind the veil, which in turn gives us an anchor for our souls!

The author of Hebrews says it best:

So let us come boldly to the throne of our gracious God. There we will receive his mercy, and we will find grace to help us when we need it most. – Hebrews 4:16 NLT

March into that throne room already! Not arrogantly, but confidently. You have royal access, so put it to work! Prayer engages the powers of heaven. Why would we not ask?

3 thoughts on “Overflow #2: Royal Access

  1. This message says it ALL!!!!! The Power lies in prayer, and we have the power to be prayerfully powerful!!!!! We have not, because we ask not!!!!!!

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